Too Fit to Quit

Health and Fitness Tips and Advice

Does lung disease prevent you from exercising?

There are two types of lung disease:

 

Restrictive lung disease is when lung tissue is dysfunctional, decreasing one’s ability to expand the lungs. Causes of restrictive lung disease include neuromuscular disease, fractured ribs, and obesity.

 

Obstructive lung disease is when lung tissue is normal, however, flows are restricted. The major obstructive lung diseases are asthma, chronic bronchitis, and emphysema. “These diseases are characterized by chronic inflammation (causes primarily by smoking, although in the case of asthma may be caused by environmental irritants) and airway obstruction via mucus production” (NASM 407).

 

So what can you do if you have lung disease? Well you definitely CAN workout!:-)

Here are some guidelines:

 

-Aerobic exercise should be performed 3-5 days a week, at 40-60% of your maximum work capacity, for 20-45 minutes per session.

-Walking on the treadmill, stationary cycling, stair steppers, and the elliptical are great modes for cardio exercise.

-Resistance training should be performed 2-3 days a week, doing 1 set of each exercise for 8-15 reps.

-Use peripheral heart action, circulating blood between the upper and lower extremities of the body, by alternating between upper and lower body exercises during resistance training.

-Make sure you take an adequate amount of rest between each set.

And, as always, consult with a physician before beginning this or any workout regimen! Be safe and healthy, and contact me with any questions at: toofit2quitonline@gmail.com:-)

References

Clark, M.A., Lucett, S.C., Corn, R.J. (2008). NASM Essentials of Personal Fitness Training. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

 

 

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Is your pregnancy slowing you down?

It is true that pregnant women should ease up on their workouts; however, they don’t need to stop exercising completely. Exercise and other physical activities are appropriate for all pregnant women, unless a doctor tells you otherwise. Women who were physically active before their pregnancy can continue with moderate activities until the third trimester, when a reduction in exercise and other physical activities is recommended. With that being said, here are some general guidelines for the fitness program of a pregnant woman:

-Low-moderate intensity exercise (40-50% of maximum capacity) should be performed 3-5 days a week.

-Non-weight bearing activities such as swimming, the elliptical trainer, the treadmill, and cycling should be used for cardio.

-Pregnancy increases metabolic demand by 300 calories/day, so make sure you are eating enough to offset exercise effect.

-If cleared by a physician, resistance training can be performed 2-3 days a week. A circuit training format is recommended, with 1-3 sets of 12-15 reps per exercise. Make sure to get enough rest between sets.

-Workout sessions should last around 15-30 minutes each.

-Avoid exercises in a prone (on stomach) or supine (on back) position after 12 weeks of pregnancy.

-The gradual growth of the fetus can alter the posture of pregnant women, which is why flexibility and core-stabilization training is extremely important (NASM 406).

Remember to always consult a physician before entering into this or any other fitness regimen. Know your limitations and do the best you can where you are at. Also, the changes that occur during pregnancy can last for up to a month and a half after giving birth, so make sure you gradually progress to a more vigorous fitness program. I know you’ll be anxious to lose that “baby weight” but hold off for a couple months so you don’t hurt yourself! Have a safe pregnancy, don’t eat too much (you’re not actually eating for two), and stay active:-) If you have questions, email me at: toofit2quitonline@gmail.com!

References

Clark, M.A., Lucett, S.C., Corn, R.J. (2008). NASM Essentials of Personal Fitness Training. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

posted by admin in Pregnancy,Special Populations and have Comments (16)

In honor of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month…

The first blog entry of the month of October will be for people with cancer, and how they too can hit the gym. “Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States with more than one-half million deaths annually, behind cardiovascular disease” (NASM 402). However, don’t let it defeat you! You will need to make adjustments to your workout regimen, but cancer doesn’t mean you can’t be physically active. In fact, exercise has many benefits in the treatment of cancer, “including improved aerobic and muscular fitness, retention of lean body mass, less fatigue, improved quality of life, and positive effects on mood and self-concept” (NASM 402). So, let’s see what your workout program should look like:

-Low-moderate intensity aerobic exercise (50-70% of your maximum capacity) should be done 3-5 days per week.

-Avoid high intensity training during periods of cancer treatment.

-Break up your workouts, so that sessions last 25-30 minutes a piece.

-Resistance training should consist of 1 set of 8-10 exercises, 10-15 reps ea (or to fatigue), and should be performed 2-3 days a week.

-Avoid heavy lifting.

-Make sure to get enough rest between workouts.

-Depending on the severity of conditions and your level of fatigue, you may need to start with 5 minute workout sessions and gradually work your way up.

Remember to always consult with a physician before beginning this or any exercise regimen. Cancer is not a death sentence. When you start to believe it is is when the sentence begins.

References

Clark, M.A., Lucett, S.C., Corn, R.J. (2008). NASM Essentials of Personal Fitness Training. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

posted by admin in Cancer,Special Populations and have Comments (27)

Maybe bad joints are your reasoning for not working out?

Did you know, “arthritis is the most common chronic condition, affecting 50% of persons older than the age of 65 and more than 15% of the American population” (NASM 399)? Well, let’s learn more about this prevalent disease. There are two different types of arthritis:

Osteoarthritis is caused by degeneration of cartilage in joints. The lack of cartilage causes pain and inflammation at the joint because of the wear on articulating bones. The areas that are most commonly affected are joints in the hands, knees, hips, and spine.

Rheumatoid arthritis is a degenerative joint disease in which the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks its own tissue. This also causes pain and inflammation in multiple joints. Most commonly affected are the hands, feet, wrist, and knees. Morning stiffness is another characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis.

Here are some guidelines for working out with either of these conditions:

-If you have rheumatoid arthritis, avoid early morning workouts.

-If you have pain for more than an hour after an exercise routine, that particular workout should be modified or eliminated.

-Avoid high repetitions of any one exercise.

-Progress resistance training from a seated position with support to a seated position without support and finally to standing.

-Circuit training or workouts broken up into multiple sessions is recommended.

-Cardio should be performed 3-5 days a week, for an accumulated time of 30 minutes, at 60-80% of your maximum work capacity.

-Start with 10-12 reps of each exercise when doing resistance training, 1 set of 8-10 exercises, 2-3 days a week.

-Avoid heavy lifting.

-Walking on a treadmill, stationary cycling, rowers, and low-impact step aerobics are suggested for cardio.

Remember to always consult a physician prior to beginning any exercise regimen. Go at your own pace and be safe! Any questions, email me @ toofit2quitonline@gmail.com 🙂

References

Clark, M.A., Lucett, S.C., Corn, R.J. (2008). NASM Essentials of Personal Fitness Training. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

 

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Or is osteoporosis what’s preventing you from hitting the gym?

Osteoporosis is a “condition in which there is a decrease in bone mass and density as well as an increase in the space between bones, resulting in porosity and fragility” (NASM 395). We discussed in the previous blog entry about the senior population,that bone mineral density decreases with age. So, what do you do if that is worsened by osteoporosis? Remaining active is one way to ensure that adequate stress is being placed on your body, which in turn will lead to consistent bone remodeling. Let’s take a closer look at what exactly osteoporosis is. Then, I will give you guidelines for a fitness regimen if you have this condition.

There are two types of osteoporosis. Type I is most prevalent in postmenopausal women. It is characterized by a decrease in estrogen and an increase in bone reabsorption (removal of old bone) with a decrease in bone remodeling (formation of new bone). This leads to a decrease in bone mineral density. The onset of Type II, on the other hand, is seen in adults 70 years and older, and is associated with old age. However, remember that staying active can lessen your chances of developing these conditions or help decrease the effects of it if you already have osteoporosis.

So what can you do?

-Cardio should be performed 3-5 days a week, for 20-30 minutes per session, at 40-70% of your maximum work capacity.

-Resistance training is important to increase bone mineral density. A circuit training format is recommended, 1 set of 8-10 reps of each exercise, 2-3 days a week.

-Weight-supported exercises such as cycling, treadmills with handrail supports, and water aerobics is recommended for cardio.

-Flexibility, core, and balance training is important to prevent falls, especially since balance decreases with age.

-Focus on strengthening your hips, thighs, back, and arms, especially when weight training.

-Progress slowly.

Remember to always consult a physician before beginning any exercise regimen and go at your own pace. I want you to be healthy, not to hurt yourself! If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to email me at: toofit2quitonline@gmail.com:-)

References

Clark, M.A., Lucett, S.C., Corn, R.J. (2008). NASM Essentials of Personal Fitness Training. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

posted by admin in Osteoporosis,Seniors,Special Populations and have Comments (5)

Is a “bad” heart stopping you from working out?

Coronary heart disease is a serious medical condition that affects nearly 18 million individuals in the US today. Does that mean these 18 million people can’t workout? Absolutely not! “Exercise is a major factor that appears to improve the stability of the [arterial] endothelium” (endothelium refers to the deep tissue of your arteries; NASM 392). But, some adjustments should be made to your fitness regimen. Here are some basic guidelines:

-Aerobic training should be performed for 20-30 minutes, 3-5 times a week at 40-80% of your maximum capacity.

-You should aim to burn between 1500 and 2000 calories a week.

-Resistance training can only be started after exercising comfortably for AT LEAST 3 months, with no negative symptoms. Then, you can start with 1-3 sets of 10-20 reps per exercise, making sure to control your breathing and rest in between sets. As with those with high blood pressure, resistance training should be performed in a circuit style or using Peripheral Heart Action (alternating between upper and lower body to circulate blood between the upper and lower extremities).

-Avoid heavy lifting and keep a loose grip on the weights.

-Start exercises in a seated position and slowly progress to standing.

The 2 most important things I want to mention with this population is to make sure to consult with your physician BEFORE beginning any workout regimen and to GO SLOW. Do what you can. Listen to your body’s signals. Be safe and stay active! 🙂

References

Clark, M.A., Lucett, S.C., Corn, R.J. (2008). NASM Essentials of Personal Fitness Training. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

posted by admin in Heart Disease,Special Populations and have Comments (5)

Maybe your reasoning is that your blood pressure is too high?

Are you hypertensive? “Hypertension is blood pressure with the systolic (top number) reading greater than or equal to 140 mm HG and the diastolic (bottom number) reading greater than or equal to 90 mm Hg” (NASM 388). A healthy blood pressure is 120/80 mm Hg. So how can you bring your blood pressure back down to a healthy range? Well, believe it or not exercise and a healthy diet have been proven to be just as effective at reducing blood pressure as medications! And, you don’t have to workout insane amounts of time every day to get there. In fact, “low-to-moderate cardiorespiratory exercise has been shown to be just as effective as high-intensity activity in reducing blood pressure” (NASM 389). So, if you’re already on medications to lower your blood pressure, use these guidelines to start a fitness regimen that will eliminate your need for them!

-Avoid supine or prone positions, (especially when the head is lower in elevation to the heart) because this can elevate your blood pressure. For example, core exercises should be performed in a standing position, such as crunches and back extensions using a cable resistance.

-Resistance training exercises should be performed in a seated position first and gradually progressed to standing.

-Low-to-moderate intensity cardiorespiratory training should be performed (50-85% of work capacity) 3-5 days a week, for 20-45 minutes a day.

-NASM suggests that you use either circuit style for resistance training, or Peripheral Heart Action (which alternates between upper and lower body moves in order to distribute blood flow between the upper & lower extremities).

-Resistance training should be performed 2-3 days a week and consist of 1-3 sets of 8-10 exercises, 10-20 reps each.

-Avoid heavy lifting and keep a loose grip on weights.

-Set a weekly caloric burn goal of 1500-2000 calories.

Now that you have an idea of what you can do, get to it! And remember, I’m always here to help you! J

References

Clark, M.A., Lucett, S.C., Corn, R.J. (2008). NASM Essentials of Personal Fitness Training. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

posted by admin in High Blood Pressure,Hypertension,Special Populations and have Comments (6)

Do you think because you’re diabetic you can’t workout?

Well, that couldn’t be further from the truth. “Studies show that exercise improves a variety of glucose measure, including tissue sensitivity, improved glucose tolerance, and even a decrease in insulin requirements” (NASM 386).

First, let’s take a look at the 2 different types of diabetes.

Type 1 Diabetes (Insulin-dependent diabetes):

This is typically found in younger individuals, and it impairs normal glucose management. There is a lack of insulin being produced, which means that blood sugar is not optimally delivered to the cells, which results in hyperglycemia (or high levels of blood sugar).

Why is this important to note if you are planning to begin a workout regimen?

“Because exercise increases the rate in which cells utilize glucose” (NASM 386). So, if you don’t control your blood glucose levels before, during, and after exercise, your blood sugar can drop rapidly, causing hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

How can you avoid this? By making sure you have carbs before and after your workout. (You may even need them during your workout depending on the intensity and longevity).

Type 2 Diabetes (Adult-onset diabetes)

This is associated with obesity, particularly abdominal obesity. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body usually produces adequate amounts of insulin, but your cells are resistant to it.

Here’s a summary of general guidelines for working out if you are a member of this population:

-Aim to burn between 1,000 and 2,000 calories a week, progressing as is tolerable for you

-If you have been recently diagnosed with diabetes, check your glucose frequently (before, during, and after exercise) until you become more aware of your body.

-Begin with a low intensity program, (50-90%) gradually increasing workout duration to 60 minutes, as tolerable, 5-7 times a week

-Pre- and post-workout carbohydrate consumption is recommended to avoid hypoglycemia

-Resistance training should start at 1-3 sets of 8-10 exercises, 10-15 reps each, 2-3 days a week (for normal weight healthy adults)

Any questions, email me! Toofit2quitonline@gmail.com. Thanks for reading and check back for the installment in our Special Populations seriesJ

References

Clark, M.A., Lucett, S.C., Corn, R.J. (2008). NASM Essentials of Personal Fitness Training. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

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Or possibly you think you’re too fat to workout…?

Unless you haven’t noticed by now, all these population groups have a pattern—they’ve all come up with some excuse why they can’t workout. Well, I’m here to tell everyone that you can! Let’s look at people who are obese. A person is considered obese if their body mass index (BMI) is more than 30. What is your BMI? “BMI is defined as total body weight in kilograms divided by the height in meters squared” (NASM 382). A normal BMI, on the other hand is between 18.5 and 24.9. What better way to bring your BMI back down within the normal and healthy range than to work out and make better eating choices? Here are some general guidelines for your workout regimen if you are obese:

-Aim to burn 200-300 calories a day, burning at least 1250 calories a week and slowly progressing to 2000.

-Begin resistance training with seated exercises and slowly progress to standing exercises.

-Perform resistance training 2-3 times a week, 1-3 sets of 10-15 repetitions.

-Core and balance training is essential to improve upon overall control and movement of the body.

-Walking, cycling, swimming, and other weight supported exercises are recommended as cardio to begin with to decrease orthopedic stress.

-Begin with a low intensity program, and slowly progress frequency (5-7 days a week) and duration (up to 60 minutes) of exercise sessions before increasing the intensity of exercise.

Remember to always consult a physician BEFORE beginning any exercise regimen. Do what you can where you are and work your way up. You have the ability to change your life, but are you willing to take the first step? If you need motivation, support, or just need to ask me a question, don’t hesitate to email me at: toofit2quitonline@gmail.com! I’m here to helpJ

References

Clark, M.A., Lucett, S.C., Corn, R.J. (2008). NASM Essentials of Personal Fitness Training. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

posted by admin in Obesity,Overweight,Special Populations and have Comments (10)

Maybe you think you’re too old to workout?

Are you over the age of 65 and think that physical activity is no longer feasible? Well, I am here to prove you wrong! It is true that certain bodily functions decrease as your age increases, including:

-Maximum attainable heart rate

-Cardiac output

-Muscle Mass

-Balance

-Coordination

-Connective tissue elasticity

-Bone mineral density

But what if I told you that some of these symptoms can be avoided? Unfortunately, there is no fountain of youth, but “research shows that musculoskeletal degeneration may not be entirely age-related and that certain measures can be taken to prevent functional immobility” (NASM 380). You read correctly. These deficits that are responsible for decreased functional abilities in the elderly population can be slowed and even reversed! How? By working out, of courseJ

Here are some general guidelines for what your fitness regimen should look like:

-Resistance training is recommended because it will help to increase bone mass and lean body mass, 2 characteristics that decrease with age. Start with light weight and slowly add resistance. NASM recommends starting with 20-30 min sessions that include 1-3 sets of 8-10 exercises, 8-20 reps.

-Because balance and coordination decrease with age, try stationary or recumbent cycling, aquatic exercise, or treadmills with handrail supports for cardio exercise.

-Stabilization training should be emphasized, i.e. core and balance training.

-Exercises should begin in a seated position and progressed to a standing position.

-Workouts can be anywhere from 20-45 minutes, 3-5 days a week

Now, no more excuses! You are not too old to workout, and you could actually reverse the deficits that come along with “old age” by working out. So, what are you waiting for? Get to it! J

References

Clark, M.A., Lucett, S.C., Corn, R.J. (2008). NASM Essentials of Personal Fitness Training. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

posted by admin in Seniors,Special Populations and have Comments (3)